Category Archives: History, Etymology

Occam’s razor

clipped from en.wikipedia.org Occam’s razor, also Ockham’s razor,[1] is the principle that “entities should not be multiplied unnecessarily.” It is apocryphally attributed to 14th-century English logician and Franciscan friar, William of Ockham. The principle states that the explanation of any phenomenon should make as few assumptions as possible, eliminating those that make no difference in the observable predictions of the explanatory hypothesis or theory. The principle is often expressed in Latin as the lex parsimoniae (“law of parsimony“, “law of economy“, or “law of succinctness“): entia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem, roughly translated as “entities must not be multiplied beyond necessity.” An alternative version Pluralitas non est ponenda sine necessitate translates “plurality should not be posited without necessity.”[2]

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Humerus (the funny bone) – the etymology

clipped from en.wikipedia.org The humerus (ME from Latin humerus, umerus upper arm, shoulder; Gothic ams shoulder, Greek ?mos) is a long bone in the arm or forelimb that runs from the shoulder to the elbow. Anatomically, it connects the scapula and the ulna, and consists of the following three sections: The Ulnar Nerve The ulnar nerve at the distal end of the humerus near the elbow is sometimes referred to in popular culture as ‘the funny bone’. Striking this nerve can cause a tingling sensation (“funny” feeling), and sometimes a significant amount of pain.

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